Go to, Get to

Go means to move from one place to the next place. So use go when the focus of your sentence is movement from point A to point B:

  • go to my office every morning.
  • Sometimes I go to the deli to pick up breakfast.
  • go home around 9:00pm

Get means to arrive, so we use get when the focus of the sentence is on arrving at a place:

  • get to the train station about 7:10.
  • After I get to Manhattan, I walk to my office.
  • I usually get to the office by 8:30.

Much

Much is used as a determiner before a noun, especially in a negative sentence and questions:

  • I don’t watch much TV these days.
  • Jack said he usually doesn’t drink much wine.
  • We didn’t get much snow in NYC last winter.

Keep in mind we generally don’t use much in a positive sentence, unless we use much with too and so:

  • Jane said she drank so much wine last night.
  • My dog has too much energy, so we walk her twice a day.

We also use much as a pronoun:

  • Bob said there was a lot of pizza at the party, but he didn’t eat much.
  • Joe said there was a lot of litter in the park, but I didn’t see much. Continue reading Much

look forward to and be looking forward to

 

the difference between look forward to and be looking forward to in English.

As you know, to talk about our joyful anticipation of an upcoming event, we use look forward to + noun or look forward to + gerund (VerbING), like this:

  • I always look forward to the weekend.
  • I’m  looking forward to the party.
  • We look forward to taking our English class.
  • Jane said she is looking forward to going to Paris next week.

So, when do we use the present tense form (look forward to) and when do we use the progressive form (be looking forward to)? The answer is clear. When the event is a usual, regular, or habitual occurrence, we generally use the present tense form (look forward to). However when the event is not a usual, regular,  or habitual occurrence, we generally use the progressive form (be looking forward to):

  • I always look forward to the weekend. The weekend comes all the time.
  • We look forward to taking our English class. We regularly have class.
  • I’looking forward to the party. The party is a one time event.
  • Jane said she is looking forward to going to Paris next week.
  • Jane’s trip is a vacation, and not a usual trip.